Cover Letters – Here’s How You Write Them

Description:

Let’s be honest, cover letters are annoying to write, and they are an absolutely essential part of the process of a job search. In this webinar, you will learn a recipe to write a cover letter that you can utilize for the rest of your life, whether you are going for an internship, fellowship, scholarship, job or promotion. We will discuss the goal of a cover letter and what elements are included in an effective and compelling cover letter. Then we will write one together, using the recipe. We will address a key aspect of the main part of a cover letter which boils down to Problem-Solution-Result-Spin Back, where applicants really shine as they customize their cover letter. You will emerge with your own customized template to use for any cover letter you write in the future.

Recorded 22 September, 11 a.m. Pacific with Alaina Levine

Training Video:

How to Get a Job Now: Strategies and Tactics to Advance Your Career in a Challenge

Description:

It is never an easy time to look for a job, especially during a crisis like we are currently experiencing. This webinar will provide specific tactics you can employ now to find rewarding work. We will discuss effective techniques to clearly communicate your value to potential employers, how and where to find specific types of position announcements, how to access hidden job opportunities, how to use LinkedIn and other social media platforms in your job search, what to do before and during the job search to land the interview and how to navigate virtual interviews. Expect actionable advice to advance your job search!

Recorded 25 August 2020.

Training Video:

Virtual Networking: How to Network and Find Collaborators from Afar with Alaina Levine

Description:

Networking is the most honorable and valuable endeavor in which you can engage, because it is built on a spirit of generosity. At its core, networking is all about crafting win-win alliances where both parties provide value. You may think that “networking” can only take place in person, but this is a myth! In fact, most networking takes place from afar, and in some cases, the individuals may never even meet in person. In this webinar, we discussed strategies and tactics for finding new collaborators and building mutually-beneficial partnerships with professionals across the globe. We utilized various methods to find and reach out to people to nurture those critical conversations that can birth amazing collaborations! Let’s network! This virtual event was led by Alaina Levine from Quantum Success Solutions and was recorded on 21 July 2020.

Training Video:

Evaluating inversion techniques for soft sites in Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Abstract:

This paper will illustrate a joint inversion analysis of the ambient noise data collected at six soft sites in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, using two different joint inversion methods. We also have geotechnical (borehole and CPT) data near the sites for verifying the applicability of these methods. For both the methods we will take fundamental mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curve and H/V curve as an input. For the first method, most of energy propagation is assumed to be in the vertical direction. VS profile estimation will be done by matching the input curves with theoretical fundamental mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curve and the theoretical Rayleigh wave ellipticity curve, arriving at a best fit model iteratively. This inversion technique is based on the Neighborhood Algorithm (NA), which is a stochastic direct search method to find a global minimum. The previous search results guide the newer searches to find local minima and then these local minima are analysed to arrive at a global minimum. For the second method, the theoretical fundamental mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curve will be matched iteratively with the input dispersion curve, and the theoretical H/V curve (comprising of Rayleigh, Love, and/or body wave contributions) will be matched iteratively with the input H/V curves to minimise the misfit and arrive at a best fit model to get an estimate of VS profile. This method is based on the theory of diffuse field assumption (DFA), which states that a diffusion-like field is generated when random seismic sources generate ambient noise. In DFA, the Green’s function is proportional to the autocorrelation of seismic wavefields in frequency domain. VS depth profiles estimated by these two methods will be then validated using the geotechnical data. This study will help us in understanding the contribution of different wave types in the H/V curves calculated using the ambient noise data and in determining the most efficient and applicable method for site assessment.

Media has not been submitted for this Presentation

Towards Quasi-Automated Estimates of Directivity and Related Source Properties of Small to Moderate Southern California Earthquakes with Second Seismic Moments Using Weighted Stacked EGFs

Abstract:

We develop a method for quasi-automated estimation of directivity, rupture area, duration, and centroid velocity of earthquakes with second seismic moments. The method is applied to small to moderate earthquakes in southern California. P and S phase picks are given by a 1-D ray tracing algorithm and cataloged event locations. These are refined for deconvolution by using a grid search on zero-crossings within a short time window around the automated P/S picks. Source Time Functions (STFs) of target events are derived using deconvolution with a stacked empirical Green’s function (seGf). The use of seGf suppresses non-generic source effects such as directivity in individual eGf’s. The seGf for each target event is based on stacking individual eGfs (normalized by seismic potencies) selected by spatial and magnitude criteria as well as performances in the projected Landweber deconvolution. A weighted stack of eGfs, with weight coefficients grid searched and determined by waveform fits, helps further to correct inaccuracies of focal mechanisms. Compared with a single eGf, analysis with a weighted stack can significantly improve waveform fit and typically allows getting STFs at 5-10 more stations. The method is suitable for analysis of large seismic datasets and it works for target events in southern California with magnitudes as small as 3.5. Most events analyzed so far have significant directivities.

Media has not been submitted for this Presentation

Anatomy of Old Faithful from Subsurface Seismic Imaging of Yellowstone National Park, Upper Geyser Basin

Abstract:

The Upper Geyser Basin (UGB) in Yellowstone contains one of the highest concentrations of hydrothermal features on Earth including the iconic Old Faithful geyser. Although this area has been the focus of many geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies, the shallow (<200 m) subsurface structure remains poorly characterized due to limited instrument implementations in this delicate and sensitive environment. The recent availability of seismic dense arrays (large-N) permits an environmental-friendly approach to investigate the detailed crustal structure from the low-cost and easy-deployed geophones. To probe the detailed structure in relation to the hydrothermal plumbing of the UGB, we deployed large-N arrays of 3C 5-Hz geophones in both November of 2015 and 2016, composed of 133 stations with ~50 m spacing, and 519 station locations, with an ~20 m spacing, respectively. We constructed cross-correlation functions (CCFs) and extracted Rayleigh-wave signals between 1-10 Hz via seismic signals excited by nearby hydrothermal features. We observe a clear lateral velocity boundary at 3.3 Hz frequency that delineates a higher phase velocity of ~1.6 km/s in the NE and a lower phase velocity of ~1.0 km/s in the SW corresponding to the local geologic formation of rhyolitic and glacial deposits, respectively. We also image a relatively shallow (10-60 m deep) large reservoir with an estimated porosity 30% located ~100 m southwest of Old Faithful from the significant spatial-dependent waveform distortions and delays between 5-10 Hz. This reservoir is likely controlled by the local geology with a rhyolitic deposit in the NE acting as a relatively impermeable barrier to vertical fluid ascent. In addition to the static structure, we observe temporal variations in both phase and amplitude from the minutely CCFs with regard to the potential influences from instrument resonance, seismic source, and structure. The preliminary results of variations will be demonstrated and discussed.

Media has not been submitted for this Presentation