Tide Gauges Capture Tremor Episodes in Cascadia

15 February 2019–Hourly water level records collected from tide gauges can be used to measure land uplift caused by episodic tremor and slip of slow earthquakes in the Cascadia Subduction Zone, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. Global Positioning System (GPS) data … Continue Reading »

At Work: Vedran Lekic

When an earthquake occurs, seismic waves travel throughout the Earth. As they encounter material of different rigidity, however, they slow down or change direction. By mapping out where this happens, scientists can create images of the structures and processes within the deep Earth – a technique known as global tomography. … Continue Reading »

Toppled Train Offers Insight into 1906 Earthquake

By mathematically modeling the movements of a locomotive that toppled from the tracks north of San Francisco during the city’s infamous 1906 earthquake, researchers have calculated a lower limit on the earthquake ground motion at the spot of the tipped train. Their report in the journal Seismological Research Letters concludes … Continue Reading »

Update for U.S. Government Employees

In response to the U.S. Government shutdown, SSA has taken several steps in the hope that government employees will be able to fully participate in the SSA Annual Meeting.  Please check here for future updates.

25 January 2019: The Co-Chairs have nearly completed the process of scheduling all oral presentations.  Here’s what to expect next if you are a government employee affected by the shutdown. … Continue Reading »

At Work: Rémy Bossu

On 30 November 2018, users of the LastQuake app received notifications on their phones and computers—an M7.0 earthquake had just struck Alaska. Upon clicking the notification, they were taken to a page with maps, data and comments from those who felt the quake. Within seconds, they knew exactly where and … Continue Reading »